Adriana Johanna Haanen

Adriana Johanna Haanen
14.06.1814 (Oosterhout, The Netherlands) - 08.10.1895 (Oosterbeek, The Netherlands)

Nationality: Dutch



biography

Adriana Johanna Haanen was born on June 14, 1814 in Oosterhout, in the southern part of Holland. She was the fourth of six children. Her father, Casparis Haanen (1778-1849) was an art dealer, restorer and painter of churches, interiors and landscapes. Just like her two older brothers and younger sister, Adriana received her first painting lessons from her father. From these modest beginnings she developed into one of the most successful flower and still life painters of the 19th century.

Haanen made use of national and international exhibitions to sell her work. Her still lifes with flowers and fruit, sometimes with dead game, were popular among art lovers in the 19th century. This is not only reflected by the prices she was able to ask for her work in exhibitions - sometimes up to fifteen hundred guilders - but also by the various awards she received for her work.

In 1845 Haanen became an honorary member of the Amsterdam Royal Academy and in 1855 she joined the artist association Arti et Amicitiae. In 1862 she received the gold medal at the Exhibition of Living Masters in Amsterdam. The Dutch King Willem II (1792-1849) purchased a work by Haanen for his collection and her work was also included in the collection of the Dutch State, notable since it took place during her life. Haanen also gave drawing and painting lessons. Among her pupils were Anna Adelaide Abrahams (1849-1930) and Christina Alida Blijdenstein (1823-1859).

Haanen is considered one of the three most famous women still life painters of the 19th century. Like the younger Geraldine van de Sande Bakhuyzen (1826-1895) and Margaretha Roosenboom (1843-1896) she paid attention to the natural appearance and true character of the flowers in her still lifes. This stands out from the "stiff" arranged bouquets in 17th-century still lifes. Compared to her contemporaries, Haanen painted her flowers in a loose manner. She favored spontaneous arrangements, sometimes in a basket, with a strong palette.

Haanen lived and worked most of her life in Amsterdam, but she died in 1895 at her home in Oosterbeek, at the age of 81. She was buried in Oosterbeek in the cemetery of St. Bernulphuskerk.  


literature

Catalogus van de tentoonstelling van kunstwerken door vrouwen vervaardigd in de kunstzaal van het panorama-gebouw, Plantage tegenover Artis, 1882, p. 7; Cat. nalatenschap A. Haanen te Oosterbeek, Amsterdam (Voskuil & Co.), 2-6-1896; Tent.cat. De Vrouw 1813-1913, Afdeeling Beeldende Kunsten, Amsterdam 1913, p. 22; A. Hoogenboom, De stand des kunstenaars. De positie van kunstschilders in Nederland in de eerste helft van de negentiende eeuw, Leiden 1993, p. 151, 172, 173; C. Stolwijk, Uit de schilderswereld. Nederlandse kunstschilders in de tweede helft van de negentiende eeuw, Leiden 1998, p. 142, 159, 257, 267, 362; J. Kapelle, S. de Bodt e.a., Magie van de Veluwezoom, Arnhem, 2006, p. 33, 57, 59, 182, 190; P. van der Kuil, Jan Kneppelhout en zijn tijdgenoten. Een wandeling door het Oosterbeek van de 19de eeuw, Oosterbeek 2007, p. 145; S. van der Maarel, 'De negentiende-eeuwse kunstenaarsfamilie Haanen', RKD Bulletin 2010, nr. 2, p. 39-47.


Exhibitions

Tentoonstelling van kunstwerken door vrouwen vervaardigd in de kunstzaal van het panorama-gebouw, Plantage tegenover Artis, 1882;
De Vrouw 1813-1913, Afdeeling Beeldende Kunsten, Amsterdam 1913 


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A Flower Still Life

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